White Space Art Asia | Artist

Alejandro Contreras Moiraghi

Alejandro Contreras Moiraghi

Alejandro Contreras Moiraghi’s art exudes a quintessential Argentinian attitude – unreservedness brings to the fore passion and sentimentality. Alejandro calls his characters tipitos, or ‘the little dudes’. The tipitos tell their stories within everyday settings; in a toilet or a sneaker, in a car or around food or a past-due telephone bill. They perform curious rituals in which they seem to parade and dance. They laugh and cry; their faces display drama and comedy. What the tipitos think or feel, they think or feel it passionately. They embody the Latin bravado; brash, carefree and always on the move.

Alejandro Contreras Moiraghi

Born in 1973
Graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Plastic Arts with engraving specialisation from the faculty of Arts of the National University of Tucuman in Argentina.
2001 Awarded the "Alberto j. Trabucco scholarship of Artistic perfectionism" from the National Academy of Beautiful Arts
2002 The “Encouragement to Artistic Creation” scholarship
2006 Scholarship of Artistic Perfectionism from the National Fund for Arts

Alejandro Contreras Moiraghi’s art exudes a quintessential Argentinian attitude – unreservedness brings to the fore passion and sentimentality. Alejandro calls his characters tipitos, or ‘the little dudes’. The tipitos tell their stories within everyday settings; in a toilet or a sneaker, in a car or around food or a past-due telephone bill. They perform curious rituals in which they seem to parade and dance. They laugh and cry; their faces display drama and comedy. What the tipitos think or feel, they think or feel it passionately. They embody the Latin bravado; brash, carefree and always on the move.

2017 Singapore Affordable Art Fair April Edition, Singapore F1 Pit Building, White Space Art Asia
2015 Solo Show “Vertigo” – Cetro Cultural Dr.Alberto Rouges, Fundacion Miguel Lillo, Tucuman Argentina
2015 Arte Abasto – Tucuman Argentina
2014 Solo Show “ De Paro” - Museo Provincial De Bellas Artes Timoteo Navarro, Argentina
2014 Group Show “ La Colgada” - - Centro Cultural Virla, Argentina
2013 Arte Espacio – Bueno Aires Argentina
2013 Arte Abasto – Tucuman Argentina
2010 Intrnational Art Fair of Bogota, Columbia
2010 Illustrated Mario Benedetti’s book “Sálvese quien pueda” (Every Man for Himself), published by Centro de Arte Moderno, Madrid, Spain.
2009 Traveled to Johannesburg on a residency fellowship
2008 Arte Américas (Miami); Art BO (Bogotá); Argentine Consulate, New York.
2007 Art Madrid, Pabellón de Cristal, Casa de campo de Madrid.
2006 Argentine Embassy in Washington DC, USA
2005 Palais de Glace. Buenos Aires, Argentina
2005 Gallery Hall IV. Buenos Aires, Argentina
2004 Banco Provincia Museum. Buenos Aires, Argentina
2004 Contemporary Arts Centre Simon I. Patino. La Paz. Bolivia
2003 Expo Trastienda; Centro Cultural Borges, Buenos Aires; Palais de Glace, Buenos Aires; Galería Pabellón IV, Buenos Aires; Galería Isidro Miranda, Buenos Aires; Bacano Gallery, Buenos Aires; Centro de Arte Moderno, Madrid.
2003 Arte BA
2003 An open art studio in Galerías Harrods, Buenos Aires
2002 Centro Cultural Recoleta, Buenos Aires
2001 Centro Cultural Rougés, Tucumán

Los Tipitos by Alejandro Contreras Moiraghi

Alejandro Contreras Moiraghi’s artistic production is torn between being figurative and non-figurative; between painting and drawing on the one hand, and photography on the other; between the object and the two-dimensional surface; between installation and action. In this dispute between dichotomies there is no preponderance of any component, since the opposing entities may become one or the other.

His characters, the tipitos (the little dudes), are peculiar creatures who adopt the same attitude as their author: they either settle inside the picture or outside the frame, they stay in the spotlight or hang from the canvass; in other words, they alternate between both realities, or remain in the frame. The tipitos tell their stories within everyday settings: in a toilet or a sneaker; in a car or around food or a telephone past-due bill; boiling in a kettle or trying to flee from a shabby denim pocket. It makes no difference for them to be dressed in colors or stay as black and white beings. They laugh and cry: their faces show drama and comedy, but their distinctive tone is cynicism.

The artist makes them go on pilgrimage. He gives them movement, as if they were performing curious rituals in which they seem to parade and dance.

Contreras Moiraghi is also torn between other “in-betweens.” While his paintings have a strong neoexpressionist descent, the influence of comics and the conception of some of his works as virtual vignettes cannot be denied. When he works with objects or installations, however, he approaches a neo conceptual proposition.

The tipitos are countless, but they are one at the same time; the individual can be perceived as a mob, and vice versa.

Contreras Moiraghi organizes the space and pre-produces his objects. He mounts staging and builds. And above all, he incorporates fiction to reality and the latter to the former. From this perspective, there are works that can be understood as deconstructive practices: when he inverts and slides his figures close to real objects, reality and fiction are not on the same level, although they do not oppose. They undergo a dislocation process.

Dislocation can also be interpreted as being “in-between” in that it implies moving from one place to another without staying definitely in any.
Jorge Figueroa

Scroll down to load more

Rayuela: Alejandro Contreras Moiraghi

Published on Jul 30, 2014

Alejandro Contreras Moiraghi’s art exudes a quintessential Argentinian attitude – unreservedness brings to the fore passion and sentimentality. Alejandro calls his characters tipitos, or ‘the little dudes’. The tipitos tell their stories within everyday settings; in a toilet or a sneaker, in a car or around food or a past-due telephone bill. They perform curious rituals in which they seem to parade and dance. They laugh and cry; their faces display drama and comedy. What the tipitos think or feel, they think or feel it passionately. They embody the Latin bravado; brash, carefree and always on the move.